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Speeding up nested for-loops when vectorization seems to fail

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Adam Pigon
Adam Pigon on 13 Feb 2020
Commented: Adam Pigon on 19 Feb 2020
Dear All, I have the following problem.
There are relatively simple operations of barycentric interpolation in a large, multi-dimensional array, which leads to long computing times. The code is given as follows:
clear all;
clc;
% auxilliary matrices and vectors
na = 100;
nm = 100;
nL = 10;
a = 1:na;
m = 1:nm;
[ap_grid, mp_grid] = ndgrid(a,m);
[a_grid, m_grid] = ndgrid(a,m);
A = randn(100,na,nm,2,2,3);
M = randn(100,na,nm,2,2,3);
AP_int1 = zeros(100,na,nm,2,2,3,nL);
MP_int1 = zeros(100,na,nm,2,2,3,nL);
AP_int2 = zeros(100,na,nm,2,2,3,nL);
MP_int2 = zeros(100,na,nm,2,2,3,nL);
a_gridVEC = repmat( permute( a_grid, [3 1 2 4 5 6] ), 100,1,1,2,2,3);
m_gridVEC = repmat( permute( m_grid, [3 1 2 4 5 6] ), 100,1,1,2,2,3);
% looped computations
tic
for q1 = 1:100
for q2 = 1:2
for q3 = 1:2
for q4 = 1:3
for r1 = 1:nL % a time consuming loop
ap1 = ap_grid(1,1); % in the real situation points ap and mp change every iteration
ap2 = ap_grid(1,2);
ap3 = ap_grid(2,1);
mp1 = mp_grid(1,1);
mp2 = mp_grid(1,2);
mp3 = mp_grid(2,1);
a1 = A(q1,1,1,q2,q3,q4); % in the real situation the 2nd and 3rd indices of A and M change every iteration
a2 = A(q1,1,2,q2,q3,q4);
a3 = A(q1,2,1,q2,q3,q4);
m1 = M(q1,1,1,q2,q3,q4);
m2 = M(q1,1,2,q2,q3,q4);
m3 = M(q1,2,1,q2,q3,q4);
for r2 = 1:na
for r3 = 1:nm
a_int1 = a_grid(r2,r3);
m_int1 = m_grid(r2,r3);
% barycentric interpolation (weights)
w1 = ( (m2-m3)*(a_int1-a3) + (a3-a2)*(m_int1-m3) ) / ( (m2-m3)*(a1-a3) + (a3-a2)*(m1-m3) );
w2 = ( (m3-m1)*(a_int1-a3) + (a1-a3)*(m_int1-m3) ) / ( (m2-m3)*(a1-a3) + (a3-a2)*(m1-m3) );
w3 = 1 - w1 - w2;
% barycentric interpolation (results)
if w1 < -0.25 || w2 < -0.25 || w3 < -0.25 % we allow for only 'a bit' of extrapolation
AP_int2(q1,r2,r3,q2,q3,q4,r1) = NaN;
MP_int2(q1,r2,r3,q2,q3,q4,r1) = NaN;
else
AP_int2(q1,r2,r3,q2,q3,q4,r1) = w1 * ap1 + w2 * ap2 + w3 * ap3;
MP_int2(q1,r2,r3,q2,q3,q4,r1) = w1 * mp1 + w2 * mp2 + w3 * mp3;
end
end % loop with nm iterations
end % loop with na iterations
end % a time consuming loop
end
end
end
end
toc
% vectorized computations
tic
for r1 = 1:nL % a time consuming loop (in the real situation points ap,mp,a and m change every iteration of this loop)
ap1 = repmat( ap_grid(1,1), 100,na,nm,2,2,3);
ap2 = repmat( ap_grid(1,2), 100,na,nm,2,2,3);
ap3 = repmat( ap_grid(2,1), 100,na,nm,2,2,3);
mp1 = repmat( mp_grid(1,1), 100,na,nm,2,2,3);
mp2 = repmat( mp_grid(1,2), 100,na,nm,2,2,3);
mp3 = repmat( mp_grid(2,1), 100,na,nm,2,2,3);
a1 = repmat( A(:,1,1,:,:,:), 1,na,nm,1,1,1);
a2 = repmat( A(:,1,2,:,:,:), 1,na,nm,1,1,1);
a3 = repmat( A(:,2,1,:,:,:), 1,na,nm,1,1,1);
m1 = repmat( M(:,1,1,:,:,:), 1,na,nm,1,1,1);
m2 = repmat( M(:,1,2,:,:,:), 1,na,nm,1,1,1);
m3 = repmat( M(:,2,1,:,:,:), 1,na,nm,1,1,1);
% barycentric interpolations (weights)
w1 = ( (m2-m3).*(a_gridVEC-a3) + (a3-a2).*(m_gridVEC-m3) ) ./ ( (m2-m3).*(a1-a3) + (a3-a2).*(m1-m3) );
w2 = ( (m3-m1).*(a_gridVEC-a3) + (a1-a3).*(m_gridVEC-m3) ) ./ ( (m2-m3).*(a1-a3) + (a3-a2).*(m1-m3) );
w3 = 1 - w1 - w2;
w1(w1<-0.25) = NaN; % we allow for only 'a bit' of extrapolation
w2(w2<-0.25) = NaN;
w3(w3<-0.25) = NaN;
% barycentric interpolations (results)
AP_int1(:,:,:,:,:,:,r1) = w1 .* ap1 + w2 .* ap2 + w3 .* ap3;
MP_int1(:,:,:,:,:,:,r1) = w1 .* mp1 + w2 .* mp2 + w3 .* mp3;
end
toc
Unfortunately, vectorization of these looped operations makes computational times only worse, contradicting the common Matlab knowledge that vectorization always helps. Why is it so? Is there any other way of speeding up the code? The parfor loop also slows down the code. Would it help to write this piece of code in C++ and call it from Matlab?

  3 Comments

Stephen Cobeldick
Stephen Cobeldick on 14 Feb 2020
"...contradicting the common Matlab knowledge that vectorization always helps."
It doesn't.
"Why is it so?"
Because that "common Matlab knowledge" is incorrect.
Vectorized code is often much faster than using loops, because the underlying operations can be performed very efficiently using highly optimized code (usually written in C). But not always faster, as you write. That is simply incorrect. Particularly in cases where the vectorized code generates large intermediate arrays, vectorized code can easily be much slower than looped code. The real "common Matlab knowledge" requires the user to consider memory consumption, array allocation, etc. and if it really is critical, measure using the profiler, etc.
Whoever told you that "vectorization always helps" does not understand MATLAB.

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Accepted Answer

Matt J
Matt J on 14 Feb 2020
Edited: Matt J on 14 Feb 2020
Getting rid of repmat (requires R2016b or later) and working with single float precision will get you some speed-up.
In doubles:
Elapsed time is 5.396878 seconds.
Elapsed time is 4.874902 seconds.
In singles:
Elapsed time is 3.312500 seconds.
Elapsed time is 2.872178 seconds.
% auxilliary matrices and vectors
na = 100;
nm = 100;
nL = 10;
a = 1:na;
m = 1:nm;
[ap_grid, mp_grid] = ndgrid(a,m);
[a_grid, m_grid] = ndgrid(a,m);
A = randn(100,na,nm,2,2,3);
M = randn(100,na,nm,2,2,3);
AP_int1 = zeros(100,na,nm,2,2,3,nL);
MP_int1 = zeros(100,na,nm,2,2,3,nL);
AP_int2 = zeros(100,na,nm,2,2,3,nL);
MP_int2 = zeros(100,na,nm,2,2,3,nL);
a_gridVEC = repmat( permute( a_grid, [3 1 2 4 5 6] ), 100,1,1,2,2,3);
m_gridVEC = repmat( permute( m_grid, [3 1 2 4 5 6] ), 100,1,1,2,2,3);
C=cellfun(@single,{A,M,AP_int1,MP_int1 , AP_int2, MP_int2, a_gridVEC,m_gridVEC,ap_grid, mp_grid, a_grid, m_grid},'uni',0);
[A,M,AP_int1,MP_int1 , AP_int2, MP_int2, a_gridVEC,m_gridVEC,ap_grid, mp_grid, a_grid, m_grid]=deal(C{:});
% looped computations
tic
for q1 = 1:100
for q2 = 1:2
for q3 = 1:2
for q4 = 1:3
for r1 = 1:nL % a time consuming loop
ap1 = ap_grid(1,1); % in the real situation points ap and mp change every iteration
ap2 = ap_grid(1,2);
ap3 = ap_grid(2,1);
mp1 = mp_grid(1,1);
mp2 = mp_grid(1,2);
mp3 = mp_grid(2,1);
a1 = A(q1,1,1,q2,q3,q4); % in the real situation the 2nd and 3rd indices of A and M change every iteration
a2 = A(q1,1,2,q2,q3,q4);
a3 = A(q1,2,1,q2,q3,q4);
m1 = M(q1,1,1,q2,q3,q4);
m2 = M(q1,1,2,q2,q3,q4);
m3 = M(q1,2,1,q2,q3,q4);
for r2 = 1:na
for r3 = 1:nm
a_int1 = a_grid(r2,r3);
m_int1 = m_grid(r2,r3);
% barycentric interpolation (weights)
w1 = ( (m2-m3)*(a_int1-a3) + (a3-a2)*(m_int1-m3) ) / ( (m2-m3)*(a1-a3) + (a3-a2)*(m1-m3) );
w2 = ( (m3-m1)*(a_int1-a3) + (a1-a3)*(m_int1-m3) ) / ( (m2-m3)*(a1-a3) + (a3-a2)*(m1-m3) );
w3 = 1 - w1 - w2;
% barycentric interpolation (results)
if w1 < -0.25 || w2 < -0.25 || w3 < -0.25 % we allow for only 'a bit' of extrapolation
AP_int2(q1,r2,r3,q2,q3,q4,r1) = NaN;
MP_int2(q1,r2,r3,q2,q3,q4,r1) = NaN;
else
AP_int2(q1,r2,r3,q2,q3,q4,r1) = w1 * ap1 + w2 * ap2 + w3 * ap3;
MP_int2(q1,r2,r3,q2,q3,q4,r1) = w1 * mp1 + w2 * mp2 + w3 * mp3;
end
end % loop with nm iterations
end % loop with na iterations
end % a time consuming loop
end
end
end
end
toc
% vectorized computations
tic
for r1 = 1:nL % a time consuming loop (in the real situation points ap,mp,a and m change every iteration of this loop)
ap1 = ( ap_grid(1,1));
ap2 = ( ap_grid(1,2));
ap3 = ( ap_grid(2,1));
mp1 = ( mp_grid(1,1));
mp2 = ( mp_grid(1,2));
mp3 = ( mp_grid(2,1));
a1 = ( A(:,1,1,:,:,:));
a2 = ( A(:,1,2,:,:,:));
a3 = ( A(:,2,1,:,:,:));
m1 = ( M(:,1,1,:,:,:));
m2 = ( M(:,1,2,:,:,:));
m3 = ( M(:,2,1,:,:,:));
% barycentric interpolations (weights)
w1 = ( (m2-m3).*(a_gridVEC-a3) + (a3-a2).*(m_gridVEC-m3) ) ./ ( (m2-m3).*(a1-a3) + (a3-a2).*(m1-m3) );
w2 = ( (m3-m1).*(a_gridVEC-a3) + (a1-a3).*(m_gridVEC-m3) ) ./ ( (m2-m3).*(a1-a3) + (a3-a2).*(m1-m3) );
w3 = 1 - w1 - w2;
w1(w1<-0.25) = NaN; % we allow for only 'a bit' of extrapolation
w2(w2<-0.25) = NaN;
w3(w3<-0.25) = NaN;
% barycentric interpolations (results)
AP_int1(:,:,:,:,:,:,r1) = w1 .* ap1 + w2 .* ap2 + w3 .* ap3;
MP_int1(:,:,:,:,:,:,r1) = w1 .* mp1 + w2 .* mp2 + w3 .* mp3;
end
toc

  2 Comments

Matt J
Matt J on 14 Feb 2020
Using the gpuArrays would also help the vectorized version even further. The following was using the GeForce GTX 1050,
na = 50;
nm = 50;
nL = 10;
....
Elapsed time is 1.304855 seconds. %double floats on CPU
Elapsed time is 0.521651 seconds. %double floats on GPU
Elapsed time is 0.785172 seconds. %single floats on CPU
Elapsed time is 0.278735 seconds. %single floats on GPU
Adam Pigon
Adam Pigon on 19 Feb 2020
Thank you for your answer. I can only add that experimenting with the loop ordering (matrix column vs row indexing) and vectorizing only certain parts of the problem can speed up the code a bit.

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More Answers (1)

Matt J
Matt J on 14 Feb 2020
Edited: Matt J on 14 Feb 2020
I tend to think you should be using scatteredInterpolant rather than implementing your own interpolation routine with loops.

  1 Comment

Adam Pigon
Adam Pigon on 19 Feb 2020
Although scatteredInterpolant could be a solution in such problems, in this very case it is not. Interpolation serves here as an approximation for solving equations. As long as these equations have precisely one solution the scatteredInterpolant works well. Unfortunately, it stops working when we have multiple soluitions, which is a case in my problem.

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